Central Bhutan

Central BhutanThe centre circuit comprises of the two central Districts of Trongsa and Bumthang. The Centre circuit boasts unique attractions and is home to many sacred monuments in the country. The two Districts in the centre circuit also defined much of our History and till the early 1950’s was the seat of power for our two Kings.  In this circuit one may attend the Nomads festival of Bumthang and delve into the wonders of a living culture of our nomads and participate in the Matsutake festival of Ura and taste the high altitude mushroom and drown in the Red panda beer. One can also witness numerous festivals including the annual tshechu of Trongsa and Bumthang, the Jampa Lhakhang tshechu, or witness the Ura tshechu that is unique. You may also visit the Ta Dzong that is now turned into a museum with its dominating four towers or visit the Wangdue Choling palace in Chamkhar built by our 1st King Ugyen Wangchuck.

You may also trek the Thrumshingla National Park and try and spot the six species of globally threatened birds that includes the Rufous necked hornbill, Rufous-throated wren-babbler, Satyr Tragopan, Beautiful nuthatch, Ward’s trogon and Chestnut-breasted partridge. Or further still try and spot the Red Panda or the foot prints of the Royal Bengal Tiger. The park forests range from alpine to sub-tropical broadleaf types.

 

Destinations in Central Bhutan

Bumthang

Bumthang: The spiritual heartland of Bhutan This region that spans from 2,600-4,500m is the religious heartland of the nation and home to some of its oldest Buddhist temples and monasteries.  Tales of… (more…)

Tang Mebar Tsho

Located along the way to the Tang village over the feeder road under Bumthang valley, it takes thirty minutes drive to the Mebar Tsho from the Chamkhar town. Mebar Tsho is considered one of the most sacred… (more…)

Trongsa

Trongsa: The Vanguard of the Warriors Pelela pass at 3300m is an important dividing range that separates Western Bhutan from Central and Eastern Bhutan. Crossing this important Pass, one may enjoy the… (more…)

 

Bumthang

Bumthang: The spiritual heartland of Bhutan

This region that spans from 2,600-4,500m is the religious heartland of the nation and home to some of its oldest Buddhist temples and monasteries.  Tales of Guru Padmasambhava and the tertons (“religious treasure-discoverers”) still linger in this sacred region.  The district is sub-divided into the four blocks of Chokhor, Chumey, Tang and Ura. The valleys are broad and gentle carved by the ancient glaciers. The wide and scenic valleys draws a large number of tourists each year.

Jakar Dzong:

The Jakar Dzong or the “Castle of the White Bird” dominates the Chamkhar valley and overlooks the town. Constructed in 1549, by the Tibetan Lam Nagi Wangchuk, the Dzong played an important role as the fortress of defence of the whole eastern Dzongkhags. It also became the seat of the first king of Bhutan. A special feature of the Dzong is the approximately fifty meter high Utse or the Central tower, which is distinct from most other Dzongs in Bhutan. The other unique feature of the Dzong is a sheltered passage, with two parallel walls, interconnected by fortified towers, which gave the population of the fortress access to water in the case of a siege. The protected water supply is still intact to this day. Jambey Lhakhang: This monastery was built in the 7th century by the Tibetan king, Songtsen Gampo.  It is one of 108 monasteries which he built to subdue evil spirits in the Himalayan region.  Its present architectural appearance dates from the early 20th century.

Kurje Lhakhang:

Located further along the valley, Kurje Lhakhang comprises three temples.  The one on the right was built in 1652 against the rock face where Guru Padmasambhava meditated in the 8th century.  The middle temple is built on the site of a cave containing a rock with the imprint of the Guru’s body, and is therefore considered to be the most holy.  The temple on the left was built in the 1990s by H.M. Ashi Kesang Wangmo Wangchuck, Grand-Queen Mother.  These three temples are surrounded by a 108 chorten wall.

Tamshing Lhakhang:

Located across the river from Kurje Lhakhang, this temple was founded in 1501 by Terton Pema Lingpa, a re-incarnation of Guru Padmasambhava.  There are very old religious paintings around the inner walls of the temple, which was restored at the end of the 19th century.

Thangbi Goemba

A walk of about 30 minutes north of Kurje Lhakhang leads one to this monastery, situated in the middle of a wide fertile plateau overlooking the river.  Founded in 1470 by Shamar Rinpoche of the Karma Kagyupa religious school, the building comprises two sanctuaries and a temple of terrifying deities.  The sanctuary on the ground floor contains statues of the past, present and future Buddhas and three clay statues probably dating to the end of the 15th century.  On the upper floor, the vestibule contains two remarkable paintings of Guru Rinpoche’s heaven, and the Buddha Amitabha’s heaven.

Ngang Lhakhang

This temple is a few hours’ walk from Thangbi Gompa, situated about 100m above the valley floor in the small region of Ngang Yule (“Swan Land”).  The site was visited by Guru Rinpoche.  The present temple was built in the 15th century by Lama Namkha Samdup, a contemporary of Pema Lingpa.  A three day festival is held here each winter, with masked dances in honor of the founder of the temple.

Ura valley

From Jakar to Ura is 48 km., about one and a half hours’ drive.  To reach here, the road climbs through amazingly open countryside, only occasionally running into forest.  Sheep pastures line the road up to 20 km. behind the southern tip of the Tang valley.  The road crosses Ura-la pass (3,600m), on the approach to which there is a magnificent view of Mt.  Gangkar Puensum.  Villages in Ura have clustered houses, which is quite unusual in Bhutan.  Above Ura village (3,100m) there is a new temple is dedicated to Guru Rinpoche.  Inaugurated in 1986, it contains a huge statue of the Guru and remarkable wall paintings of the cycle of his teachings.  Within the last 25 years Ura has been transformed from a marginal community to a prosperous valley.

Tang Mebar Tsho

Located along the way to the Tang village over the feeder road under Bumthang valley, it takes thirty minutes drive to the Mebar Tsho from the Chamkhar town.

Mebar Tsho is considered one of the most sacred sites in the region as it relates to the renowned treasure reveler, Terton Pema Lingpa-incarnated disciple of Padmasambhava who discovered treasure from the lake somewhere around late 15th century.

It is believed that Terton Pema Lingpa had a vision about hidden treasures to be found at the foot of Tang Valley which was indicated by Guru Rinpoche many centuries before. Since the people of tang and the local ruler was cynical about it, he held a butter lamp in his hand, he jumped into the lake, remained under water for a long time, and he re-emerged  holding a chest and a scroll of paper in his hand and the butter lamp held in his hand still burning bright. Thereafter, the lake came to be known as Mebartsho (the burning Lake).

Today this small fresh water lake is a sacred pilgrimage place for Bhutanese with bright multicolored prayer flags surrounding the place and on auspicious days people go and offer butter lamps on the lake. Many tourist visit the site to observe spectacular beauty of the place and it is also an important site for historians.

 

Trongsa

Trongsa: The Vanguard of the Warriors

Pelela pass at 3300m is an important dividing range that separates Western Bhutan from Central and Eastern Bhutan. Crossing this important Pass, one may enjoy the pastoral feeling as you drive deeper into the valley with meadows where sheep and yaks graze. The bamboos that grow plenty on these hillsides are trimmed by yaks. Yaks love the dwarfed bamboos. If you are a bird watcher, look out for the specialty called the Wren Babbler taking refuge underneath those bamboos. In the months of April-June, the hillsides are painted with the rhododendron blooms. Trongsa, the sacred and the temporal heart of the country is the first district that you will come across.

Trongsa Dzong:

Built in 1648, it was the seat of power over central and eastern Bhutan.  Both the first and second kings of Bhutan ruled the country from this ancient seat.  All four kings were invested as Trongsa Penlop (“governor”) prior to ascending the throne.  The dzong is a massive structure with many levels, sloping down the contours of the ridge on which it is built.  Because of the dzong’s highly strategic position, on the only connecting route between east and west, the Trongsa Penlop was able to control effectively the whole of the central and eastern regions of the country from here.

Ta Dzong:

This watchtower, which once guarded Trongsa Dzong from internal rebellion, stands on a promontory above the town. It was built by Chogyal Minjur Tempa, the 1st Governor of Trongsa in 1652. It has four observation pints resembling Tiger, Lion, Garuda, and Dragon. Climb up the path to visit Ta Dzong which now houses a shrine dedicated to the epic hero, King Gesar of Ling.  A visit to this former watchtower provides visitors with an insight into the significance of Trongsa in Bhutan’s history. As of date the Ta Dzong of Trongsa is the most fascinating museum of the nation.

Thruepang Palace:

This two storied simple palace situated just above the highway in the town is the birth place of our Late King Jigme Dorji Wangchuck. It was here that on 2nd May 1928, His Majesty was born to King Jigme Wangchuck and Ashi Puntsho Choden. He spent most of his early childhood days here in this Thurepang Palace. The other palace of interest is the Eundu Choling Palace which was the winter residence of the 1st King Ugyen Wangchuck.

Kuenga Rabten Palace: The 23 km. drive from Trongsa to Kuenga Rabten takes about an hour and passes through open countryside high above a river gorge.  The land slopes quite gently in this region, and farming is well developed, so there is much of interest to observe in the fields and in the villages as one speed along.  As one approaches Kuenga Rabten, the Palace is clearly visible just below the road on the right.  It was the winter palace of the second king and is now looked after by the National Commission for Cultural Affairs.  This pleasant afternoon excursion from Trongsa offers further insights into the early days of Bhutan’s monarchy.

Chendebji Chorten:

En route to Trongsa is Chendebji Chorten, patterned on Kathmandu’s Swayambhunath Stupa, with eyes painted at the four cardinal points.  It was built in the 18th century by Lama Zhida, to cover the remains of an evil spirit that was subdued at this spot. Legend says that the evil spirit manifested as a gigantic snake.

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